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A photograph of the Botany class at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in 1934. Croasdale is pictured second in from the left in the bottom row. The back of the photograph lists her classmates.

An exhibit on the life and career of Dartmouth's first tenured female faculty member. Based on the final research paper of Caroline Cook '21, “She Had the Misfortune of Being a Woman: The Story of Hannah Croasdale, Pioneer in Algae and Academia.”

Botany - Class of 1934, Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory

A photograph of the Botany class at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in 1934. Croasdale is pictured second in from the left in the bottom row. The back of the photograph lists her classmates.

Hannah Croasdale with her friends at Woods Hole.

A photograph of Croasdale and her friends at Woods Hole in the summer 1934. They appear to be preparing to go sailing or camping.

Mounted Algae, Dasya elegans, collected at Woods Hole

Biological sample of algae, Dasya elegans, identified and mounted by Croasdale in 1929 during a summer the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole.

Degree for Doctor of Philsophy, University of Pennsylvania

Hannah Croasdale's doctorate degree from the University of Pennsylvania, awarded in 1935.

Professor Hannah T. Croasdale

An exhibit on the life and career of Dartmouth's first tenured female faculty member. Based on the final research paper of Caroline Cook '21, “She Had the Misfortune of Being a Woman: The Story of Hannah Croasdale, Pioneer in Algae and Academia.”

 

Caroline Cook began her term of residence in Summer 2018 with an interest in early female faculty at Dartmouth, an interest that eventually led her to study the striking life of Hannah Croasdale, a compelling force in the history of women at Dartmouth and women in the sciences, whose personal papers are located in Rauner Special Collections Library.

Cook considers Hannah to be a perfect example of the difference between how we remember trailblazers and pioneers and how they view themselves. She believes there is often a disconnect between the way these important figures see their work and the way we remember them today. For more on this perspective, see her article in Lady Science, “To Respect a Ghost: Remembering Women Pioneers as They Wanted.” To read Cook's fellowship blog post, visit the Rauner Library blog.

Curation by Myranda Fuentes, Institutional History Research Specialist, with item descriptions by Scout Noffke, Reference & Administrative Specialist.

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