Logo Historical Accountability Student Research Program

Welcome!

The Historical Accountability Student Research Program at the Dartmouth Library offers research opportunities for Dartmouth undergraduates to explore primary sources in our collections related to issues of diversity and inclusion in Dartmouth history.

On this website, you can view digital exhibitions, browse the projects of Historical Accountability Student Researchers, and learn how to get started with research of your own!

Digital Exhibitions

Explore the research of past Historical Accountability Student Researchers through digital exhibits of images and archival materials.

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Featured Materials

Special Collections is full of primary sources that haven't yet made it into a Historical Accountability research project. Here are some examples to pique your interest!

Samuel Ashpo (Mohegan) confesses to forsaking the rules of Christian marriage by taking another wife after discovering that his first wife has been unfaithful. In the confession, he specifically apologizes for being "married in the old Indian mode."

Samuel Ashpo (Mohegan) confesses to forsaking the rules of Christian marriage by taking another wife after discovering that his first wife has been unfaithful. In the confession, he specifically apologizes for being "married in the old Indian mode."

Petition of a committee of students including Leonard Worcester, Henry Shedd, Charles Dexter Cleveland and Nathaniel Folsom to the Dartmouth College Faculty in which they ask that Edward Mitchell, a Black applicant to the College, not be refused admission to Dartmouth College because of his color.

Petition of a committee of students to the Dartmouth College Faculty in which they ask that Edward Mitchell, a Black applicant to the College, not be refused admission to Dartmouth College because of his color.

An undated letter with an unknown recipient in which the writer, who is assumed to be Louis Benezet, shares his memories of Asakawa Kan’ichi on campus. The author's memories are fond and speak to general camaraderie between Asakawa and the rest of the student body, but the letter is still includes things like crude transcriptions of his accented speech.

An undated letter with an unknown recipient in which the writer, who is assumed to be Louis Benezet, shares his memories of Asakawa Kan’ichi on campus. 

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