Logo Historical Accountability Student Research Program
This photograph, captured outside of Leverone Field House during Alabama Governor George Wallace’s visit to Dartmouth on November 5, 1963, depicts Dartmouth students (including Richard Joseph '65) and Upper Valley community members protesting the segregationist's policies and views on race. Signs reading “liberation and integration” and “free men all” are raised in response to the politician’s recent inaugural address, in which Wallace stated, “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever.” Additional signs reference FEPC, or the Fair Employment Practices Committee, which was established by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941 to help prevent discrimination against African-Americans in defense and government jobs.

An exhibit on the Black student experience at Dartmouth College from 1960-1979, during and directly following the Civil Rights Movement. Exhibit curated by Anneliese Thomas '19 as her final fellowship project.

Students in A Better Chance Program, Summer 1967

This photograph in front of the Tuck School of Business depicts eighty-five eighth and ninth grade students alongside four instructors participating in Dartmouth’s summer ABC (A Better Chance) Program. The program aimed to prepare students from historically underrepresented backgrounds for the academic rigor of prestigious preparatory schools, and hosted talented students from across the nation throughout the 1960s.

Informational pamphlet used to recruit more Black students to Dartmouth College in the 1970s.

Compiled by Dartmouth undergraduates Albert Knight, A.J. Lonian, Bill Oldham, and George Riley, this informational pamphlet was used to recruit more Black students to Dartmouth College. In the publication, Black students are depicted in both academic and extracurricular settings and give testimonies about their college experiences.

Dartmouth community members protest the visit of George Wallace in 1963.

This photograph, captured outside of Leverone Field House during Alabama Governor George Wallace’s visit to Dartmouth on November 5, 1963, depicts Dartmouth students (including Richard Joseph '65) and Upper Valley community members protesting the segregationist's policies and views on race. Signs reading “liberation and integration” and “free men all” are raised in response to the politician’s recent inaugural address, in which Wallace stated, “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever.” Additional signs reference FEPC, or the Fair Employment Practices Committee, which was established by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941 to help prevent discrimination against African-Americans in defense and government jobs.

Flyer advertising MLK's lecture "Towards Freedom"

This flyer announces a public lecture to be delivered by Civil Rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on May 23, 1962 in 105 Dartmouth Hall. King’s lecture, which was part of Dartmouth President John Sloan Dickey’s Great Issues Course lecture series, focused on the “question of progress in race relations” in the United States, and called upon community members in the North to take part in the Civil Rights Movement.

The Temple Murals second panel, which depicts different African cultures painted near their geographic point of origin around the shape of the African continent.

The second acrylic panel The Temple Murals series is located on the left side of the hallway when facing the Shabazz Library in Dartmouth’s Shabazz Center. The panel depicts faces and masks that represent different African cultures, each painted near their geographic point of origin around the shape of the African continent. The sea of faces appears to move toward the viewer like a wave, representing the movement of the African Diaspora. Many faces in the mural were modeled after Dartmouth students on campus in the summer of 1972.

An issue of Black Hand, literary magazine and one of several publications dedicated to examining the Black experience at Dartmouth.

An issue of Black Hand, literary magazine and one of several publications dedicated to examining the Black experience at Dartmouth during the Civil Rights Movement. The staff briefing describes the publication as “allow[ing] us to reach further in that general direction of Blackness.” The staff elaborate that Black Hand is intended to be a tool for expression and a medium of communication and news dissemination.

The Black Student Experience, 1960-1979

An exhibit on the Black student experience at Dartmouth in the 1960s and 70s, curated by Anneliese Thomas '19 as her fellowship research project.

Anneliese Thomas ’19 started her fellowship in Winter 2019 consulting the papers of Errol Hill, Professor of Theater, adviser to the Afro-American Society, freshman adviser, and affirmative action officer during his tenure at the college.

Thomas used Hill's papers as a window into the Black student experience at Dartmouth in the 1960s and 70s, during and directly after the Civil Rights era in the United States. To read her fellowship blog post, visit the Rauner Library blog.

Curator’s Statement

When I first began curating this exhibit, I had no idea what I was getting into. Errol Hill’s papers alone consisted of 139 boxes, and that collection was only the starting point of my research. Throughout the past 10 weeks, I have learned more about Dartmouth than I ever could have imagined and, more specifically, more about Dartmouth than I could have imagined through the lens of students who look like me. 

I would like to thank Myranda Fuentes and Jaime Eeg '18, who served as my advisors and guided me through the entire process; without them, this exhibit would simply not exist. I would also like to thank all of the Rauner Library staff for helping every step of the way and always being willing to answer my questions, no matter how many times I asked the same thing. Most importantly, I would like to thank all of the Black students who came to campus before me - the students who stood up to Wallace, the students who clapped for Shockley and never stopped, and the students who fought to create spaces on campus where Black students were not only welcomed, but could be leaders. Thank you for your bravery and perseverance. 

Finally, I would like to mention that this is by no means a comprehensive list of everything Black students experienced from 1960-1979. Rather, my exhibit highlights some of the events Black students experienced that are rarely mentioned now, but can give a unique perspective into the campus climate at the time. I hope this exhibit sparks a conversation about what has changed since this time period, and what still needs to change.

Curated by Anneliese Thomas '19, Winter 2019 Historical Accountability Student Research Fellow, with item descriptions by Alexander Cotnoir '19, 2019-2020 Edward Connery Lathem '51 Special Collections Fellow. 

Go to top of page